Design and Conflict

Design can be the product of, the solution to or a tool in the implementation of conflict.This column seeks to explore the relationship between design and conflict, from early modern history to the present day. Ranging from local issues such as protests, to international crises as a result of political, social and religious conflicts, this column will expose the world of design and conflict from a design historical perspective. Objects, architecture and systems of design both influence and are influenced by such extreme conditions, aiding in our understanding of the relationship between people and their environments. Through this column we aim to investigate how design can be harnessed as resistance or exploited through submission to conflict. The correlation between design and conflict can be identified worldwide and throughout history – we welcome submissions related to all disciplines and interests to open the discussion of conflict.

 

 

Bloodhound missile on Hayward Gallery's balcony

A Retrospective of our Lives

‘Do art and politics mix?’ was the name of a debate hosted by Manchester International Festival in 2007. Although MIF’s debate (as noted by one savvy audience member) blurred questions of whether art and politics do or should mix, I suspect their inconclusive end was inevitable either way. One of the most persuasive arguments that arose contended

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http://www.vam.ac.uk/moc/war-games-pages/visitor-comments/

Guns, Games and Galleries

From the 25th May 2013 to the 9th of March 2014 the V&A Museum of Childhood opened an exhibition, for children and adults alike, entitled ‘War Games’. The exhibition, which is currently travelling across the UK, explores the role of war in children’s play from 1800 to the present day

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Interior of the church of St Odulphus in Assendelft, Pieter Saenredam (1597-1665) © Wikimedia commons

Blank Walls of Inspiration

In 1566 the Dutch revolted, and countless Catholic churches, magnificently adorned and sumptuously ornate, fell into Protestant hands. The churches were ‘cleaned’ of all images, precious objects, textiles, and colour. The altarpieces and statuary were removed, and the walls and ceiling were washed with white. Pieter Jansz. Saenredam was a leading artist of the

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Male workers at the Royal Army Clothing Department on the 21st June 1918, Grosvenor Road, Pimlico.

The Costume Society Study Day: ‘Fashion and Conflict’

The Costume Society UK, ‘Fashion and Conflict: Not Living in Khaki’ On the 18th October the Costume Society UK hosted a study day at the London College of Fashion entitled ‘Fashion and Conflict: Not Living in Khaki’. Key note speakers Nigel Arch and Jane Tynan, along with a number of

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The Politics of Beauty

The National Portrait Gallery’s winter exhibition Anarchy and Beauty: William Morris and his legacy, 1860-1960 brilliantly demonstrates the wide-reaching hands of design movements and how central they can be within a culture. Morris is well-known for his nature-inspired designs and advocacy of hand-crafted products, but he is less well remembered

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Designing Remembrance

The centenary of the First World War marks a significant period in the design of remembrance. The design of exhibitions and memorials serve to recollect those who died and mark a particular anniversary or a site specific event.[1] The Imperial War Museum (IWM) is one of many national institutions currently

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