RSSTwitter

A year later…

Zenia Malmer 

 

‘Teapot and cover’ by Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, 1760-1765, England. Earthenware with a lead glaze stained with metal oxides and moulded. Museum number: 414:1069/&A-1885. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

‘Teapot and cover’ by Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, 1760-1765, England. Earthenware with a lead glaze stained with metal oxides and moulded. Museum number: 414:1069/&A-1885. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

You could say that the ‘The Cabinet of Culinary Curiosities’ started out as an experiment. An opportunity for Ning and I to explore what the combination of food history + design history would yield, and if this had a life beyond the formal assignments that the V&A/RCA History of Design course demanded. After a year of writing about mechanical ice cream makers, wagashi, pineapples, lacquered boxes, wedding cakes and recipe books, we realised that our appetite for seeking out unusual ways of discussing the material culture of food has grown. Through this experience, we now know that we have a lot more to say, although our time at Unmaking Things has now come to an end.

So what next? Ning is continuing her research into wagashi, and I will soon launch another blog called ‘The Pot and Pineapple’ that will again act as an online outlet for my ideas about food and design history. If you enjoyed my posts on ‘The Cabinet of Culinary Curiosities’, then please follow @Zenia__M to stay up-to-date with the launch date.

Finally, Ning and I would like to thank all of of our readers for their encouraging feedback and support. Putting one’s research out into the world can be quite daunting, but the positive comments we have received have made this so much easier and not to mention, thoroughly enjoyable.

Thank you!

Zenia (on behalf of ‘The Cabinet of Culinary Curiosities’ editorial team)

 

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