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Unmaking Things is an online creative platform, edited and run by History of Design students at the Victoria and Albert Museum / Royal College of Art. It is a space in which questions can be raised, work can be published, and reflected on critically. Whilst the site is operated in connection with the MA course, we encourage connections between all those engaged in the field of design history, and so we welcome a diverse range of submissions – whether from students, practitioners, or professionals.


A Farewell Note from the Editors-in-Chief:

Unmaking Things, One Year Later…

 

Craft, Technology and Productions

Craft, Technology and Productions: What We Learned and Where to Go Next


This is it: our last article on CTP. For this occasion it seems appropriate to revisit the initial questions that motivated us to...

design*systems

Design Systems: New Perspectives


Design*systems, conceived one year ago as a space where the concepts of design and systems were to be explored, has now come to an end. In this space, contributions have examined design as encounters between...

From Live to Future

Making From Below: Disobedient Objects


“These objects disclose hidden moments in which, even if only in brief flashes, we find the possibility that thing might be otherwise: that in fact, the world may also be made from below...

Materiality / Immateriality

Tools of the Trade


On 27 October 1964, Dr. Emil Haury threw an engraved trowel in the air amid great fanfare from his students, field crew, and fellow archaeologists. Where...

Material Matter

Disease and the Art of Medical Illustration: An Interview with Richard Barnett


Dr Richard Barnett is a historian of medicine, a writer and broadcaster, and an award-winning poet...

Object of the Week

One year of objects! From two altar cruets to a golden locket


When I started the History of Design M.A. I knew I liked the decorative arts. Studying beautiful objects that were nice to look at...

Objects in Translation

Shape Shifting Objects: The Attempted Atonement of The Black Joke


The life cycle of an object is not always visible, nor is it always detailed on its surface for all to see. However sometimes, when transformation and re- appropriation have been so central to an object’s story...

Taking Fashion Seriously

Frida Kahlo: The Artist, the Woman, the Myth, the Clothes


Upon her death in 1954 Diego Rivera, the husband of iconic Mexican painter Frida...

The Cabinet of Culinary Curiosities

A year later...


You could say that the ‘The Cabinet of Culinary Curiosities’ started out as an experiment. An opportunity for Ning and I to explore what the combination of food history + design history would yield, and...